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Feral Hogs
Feral Hogs in Southlake

Early Spanish Explorers probably were the first to introduce hogs in Texas over 300 years ago. As colonization increased, hog numbers subsequently increased. They provided an important source of cured meat and lard for settlers. Feral hogs may appear basically the same as domestic hogs and will vary in color and coat pattern.

A mature feral hog may reach a shoulder height of 36 inches and weigh from 100 to over 400 pounds. Hogs have four continuously growing tusks (two on top, two on bottom) and the contact causes a continuous sharpening of the lower tusks. They have relatively poor eyesight but have keen sense of hearing and smell. Feral hogs are distributed throughout much of Texas generally inhabiting the white-tailed deer range, with the highest population densities occurring in East, South, North and Central Texas. There is currently an estimated population in excess of 1.5 million feral hogs in Texas.

Frequently Asked Questions

What do feral hogs eat?
In a word, everything. Feral hogs are omnivorous, meaning they eat both plant and animal matter. They are very opportunistic feeders and much of their diet is based on availability. Foods include, grasses, forbs, roots and tubers, browse, acorns, fruits and bulbs. Animal matter includes invertebrates (insects, snails and earthworms), reptiles and birds. Hogs will also feed on domestic animals if given the opportunity.

Do feral hogs carry diseases?
Yes. In general, wild hogs carry various diseases. They include pseudo rabies, swine brucellosis, tuberculosis, bubonic plague, tularemia, hog cholera, hoof and mouth disease.

How do I keep from contacting disease?
Most of these disease are transmitted by contact, avoiding contact with wild or feral hogs is the only sure way of avoiding contracting these diseases.

Are feral hogs dangerous?
All wild animals have the potential of being dangerous, especially when wounded or cornered. In a natural state, feral hogs will prefer to run and escape danger, and are not considered dangerous. Extreme caution should be maintained when encountering any wounded, cornered, trapped animal or females with young. "Their razorsharp tusks combined with their lightning speed can cause serious injury".

Can I wipe out a hog population through trapping?
The feral hog has managed to survive, adapt, and increase their numbers despite attempts at population control. While it is possible to keep the population in check with continuous control, it is highly unlikely to eradicate a hog population within an established range. The City has established a plan to help control the feral hog population. You can find it’s basic components on the other side of this brochure.

City of Southlake's Hog Management Plan
Trapping is the most common method utilized by landowners and municipalities. This method allows for the safe and humane animal removal. The City of Southlake, Southlake Department of Public Safety has taken the position that live trapping is the appropriate method of animal control. The animals would be baited and trapped in large groups.

These groups would then be removed from the city and humanely euthanized. This option, like others will be a slow and deliberate population control program. This will be a sustained program over months and years to control overall hog populations within Southlake. The hogs have lived in this area for many years which is why total eradication is highly unlikely, but management and control of hog populations is possible through efforts of everyone working together for a common goal. Please call the Southlake Department of Public Safety at 817-748-8114 for more information.

Keller Animal Control
330 Rufe Snow Drive
Keller, Texas 76248
(817) 743-4516

Animal Control Service Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Saturday
10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Sunday
On call (817) 743-4522

Animal Adoption and Lost Pet Hours

Monday, Wednesday and Friday
11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Tuesday and Thursday
1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Saturday
10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Sunday
Closed

Lost Pets
(817) 743-4516

Pet Adoptions
(817) 743-4516

Feral Hogs
(817) 743-4522
(817) 748-8133

Non-Emergency Dispatch
Ph: (817) 743-4522

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